Target Your Perfect Job

Anita,

I wasn’t happy at my former position, so I searched the online job boards and found a similar job at another company. I started this new position six weeks ago, and already it’s worse than the one I left! What do I do now? I can’t seem to land a job I really like.

Bow-n-Arrow_iStock_000021553751Dear “MockingJaymie,”

You may be at the wrong company, in the wrong position, or you could even be in the wrong profession altogether.

Everyone has a hunger for fulfilling work. Ask yourself some soul-searching questions: What’s your passion? What’s your purpose? What’s your raison d’être, as the French inquire? Companies have mission statements; what is your life mission statement? What’s your “calling?”

If you’re more numbers or science-oriented rather than touchy-feely, this Forbes formula may help you rate dream job opportunities.

After some introspective contemplation (long walks in the woods optional, but highly recommended!), you now have the understanding to find a satisfying career path that aligns with your personal values and aspirations. Stop applying for random jobs that just so happen to be open during your job search! Make a plan to proactively seek out a position that better suits you, before it’s even advertised.

Start by compiling a list of 30-40 target companies you’d absolutely love to work for. Your willingness to relocate will determine how wide you cast your net geographically. With the advanced search tool in LinkedIn, search for Companies by entering industries in locations that line up with your passions, interests, and life goals. Click and read company profiles and Follow any that resonate with you. It’s a good professional practice to stay active on LinkedIn consistently, long before you’re in active job search mode. Comment on your favorite companies’ posts. Offer congratulations on achievements. Find connections. Nurture these online relationships before you need to ask them for a favor.

Don’t forget about offline networking as well. Join associations for the industries in which you are interested. Attend Chamber of Commerce mixers. Talk with friends about your “target companies” to see if they can introduce you to any insiders.

How do you approach these 2nd and 3rd connections and friends of friends? On his CareerPivot blog, Marc Miller suggests asking for AIR – Advice, Insights, and Recommendations. Most people will be flattered and inclined to be helpful.

In his book, 48 Days to the Work You Love, author Dan Miller recommends this 3-step process for making yourself know to those target contacts doing work you admire:

  1. Send a letter of introduction by mail, not email.
  2. In one week, send a cover letter and résumé. Again, by mail.
  3. Call to follow up (this is a step only 1-2% of job hunters do).

You’re sowing and nurturing seeds in fields where you will actually be happy in your work. Now, wait for the Reaping. Sure, this may take longer than the traditional “see job ad—apply—interview—get hired” cycle (which can sometimes take quite a while as it is). But isn’t it worth it to wait for a career that inspires?

May the odds be ever in your favor!

Readers: Have you identified your life’s purpose and found a job to support your calling? Inspire us with your story in the Comments below!

RELATED POSTS:
How to Find Jobs Not Advertised on the top Job Boards, Part 1
How to Find Jobs Not Advertised on the top Job Boards, Part 2
How to Tailor Your Résumé

Pop Quiz: What’s Your Job Seeker IQ?

Pop QuizReaders,

With school in session a short while, it’s time for the first pop quiz of the fall season! It’s an “open-book” test; I’ve generously provided links in the answer key below. But try it first without peeking to see your true Job Seeker I.Q. score.

Job Seeker IQ Quiz

1. T      F Using a boilerplate résumé that you find online is the best way not to make a mistake.
2. T      F One version of a well-polished résumé is all you need.
3. T      F You should always include your high school and/or college graduation date on your résumé.
4. T      F To get past the computer screening by the Applicant Tracking System (ATS), your résumé should be in one standard format
5. T      F If you’ve ever been fired, you should never admit it on applications or during job interviews.
6. T      F A cover letter isn’t necessary these days.
7. T      F It’s best not to tell too many people that you’re looking for a job.
8. T      F Never apply to a position unless you meet every criteria listed in the job description.
9. T      F LinkedIn is the only effective social media tool for job seekers.
10. T      F There are lots of ways to find unadvertised positions besides the online job boards.
11. T      F It is prudent to tone down my political rhetoric on my Facebook page during a job search.
12. T      F It’s perfectly okay for my girlfriend to come to the interview with me for moral support.
13. T      F It’s a good idea to cover tattoos for that important interview.
14. T      F If I practice my answers to potential interview questions, it will come off as too rehearsed.
15. T      F Interviewers will understand if I’m nervous and shy and don’t make eye contact.
16. T      F It’s more difficult to get a job long-distance.
17. T      F My so-so credit rating and a misdemeanor from my college days won’t have an effect on my job search.
18. T      F It’s important to send a thank you note after every interview.
19. T      F For every $10,000 in salary, it takes about one month of searching to find a job.
20. T      F Taking a temporary job may lead to full-time employment.

Answer Key:

  1. False. Using a boilerplate résumé format makes you a boring candidate. Sample résumés may not be appropriate for your industry. If you do utilize one, start with a template (search for one specific to the type of position for which you are applying) and customize it to make it your own. Check out my past posts, Creating a Résumé from Scratch.
  2. False. One version of a well-polished résumé is not all you need. Tailor Your Résumé when submitting for a particular opening.
  3. False. Older workers may wish to eliminate high school and/or college graduation dates (and maybe even some irrelevant first jobs) in order to “age-proof” their résumés. See Hiding the “Gray” on Your Résumé (and Beyond). Millennials may wish to hide their graduation dates to not draw attention to their inexperience. For more tips, review How to Get Hired if You Don’t Have Experience.
  4. Mostly True. In Demystifying Applicant Tracking Systems, I explain how to increase the chances that your résumé will obtain a better score from ATS. However, there may be situations when a Functional Format Résumé is the best option.
  5. False. Don’t cover up the fact that you have been fired from a previous job. The truth will find you out! Instead, use my advice for Explaining Away “You’re Fired.”
  6. False. A cover letter is a must in my book. Granted, the “cover letter” may now be a “cover email,” but it is a great opportunity to personalize your résumé and sell yourself for the open position. Read Covering the Cover Letter.
  7. False. It may not be the best idea to tell your current boss that you’re looking for a job, but Help Other People Help You Find a Job.
  8. False. If you never applied to a position unless you meet every criteria listed in the job description, you’ll be unemployed for a long, long time. Here’s my advice on Applying for a Job When Not 100% Qualified.
  9. False. LinkedIn isn’t the only effective social media tool for job seekers. Check out tips for Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Pinterest in Be a Social Seeker, Part 1 and Part 2.
  10. True. There are lots of ways to find unadvertised positions besides the online job boards. Find out where in How to Find Jobs Not Advertised on the Top Job Boards, Part 1 and Part 2.
  11. True. It is prudent to tone down political rhetoric on Facebook during a job search. Facebook: Friend or Foe offers more tips.
  12. False. It’s not a good idea to bring a girlfriend/boyfriend, spouse, or children to an interview. Avoid all Top 10 Interview Fails.
  13. True. While tattoos are becoming more mainstream, it’s still a good idea to cover tattoos during interviews.
  14. False. Practicing answers to common interview questions is a “best practice.” Review Take Stock with a Mock Interview.
  15. False. While taking nerves into consideration, interviewers definitely notice eye contact or lack thereof, so Be Body Language Conscious.
  16. True. Landing a Job Long Distance is more difficult, but not impossible.
  17. False. Bad Credit Can Cost You… Your New Job. Crimes and Misdemeanors from college days may also affect your job search. Finding Jobs for Ex-Felons is even more difficult.
  18. True. Miss Manners and Miss Anita agree: It’s important to say, “Thank You for the Interview.”
  19. False. As our infographic How Long to Find a Job shows, research indicates it takes about one month of searching to find a job for every $20,000 in salary.
  20. True. Taking a temporary job may indeed be a bridge to a full-time position.

Scoring

90%-100% You’re employed, right?
80%-90% Brush up on your résumé or interview skills.
70%-80% Try harder.
Below 70% It’s a tough world out there. Take corrective measures immediately!

Readers: How did you score on the Job Seeker IQ Quiz?

Do you have a job-related question? Ask Anita.

Subscribe to receive weekly emails with career tips and advice for job seekers, employed people, and managers and supervisors.

Be a Social Seeker, Part 1

Dear Anita,

I just heard that a friend of a friend got a job through Facebook. I never thought beyond LinkedIn for job searching on social media. Do you have any tips on how to use Facebook or Twitter in my job search?

Social Job Search InfographicDear, Social Butterfly,

I was surprised myself to see that, according to Jobvite, a whopping 76% of social job seekers found their current position through Facebook. While I couldn’t ferret out a statistic for how many people actually found a new job through LinkedIn, success stories are easier to find. And Jobvite does indicate that 94% of recruiters are active on LinkedIn, so don’t abandon the popular professional networking site just yet.

Pew Research Center found only 13% of LinkedIn users check their account daily, 25% check weekly, and 61% check less often. By contrast, 70% of Facebook users check the site daily. So it makes sense that people who are more active on Facebook may benefit from including their online friends in their job search tactics.

Facebook Job Search Tips

Conduct a Facebook makeover, including a more professional profile picture to replace that blurry selfie. Use your About section as a mini-résumé. Be sure to include all past workplaces and college information and, just like LinkedIn, add keywords about your professional skills.

Be aware: 93% of recruiters are likely to look at a candidate’s social profile and 42% have reconsidered a candidate based on social content. The three biggest offenders, according to Jobvite: illegal drug references (83%), sexual posts (70%), and spelling/grammar (66%) which narrowly beat out profanity at 63%. Go through several screens of past posts (this could be up to a year’s worth, depending on your Facebook frequency factor). Delete any posts you wouldn’t want a hiring manager to see (or “Limit Past Posts” under Settings). Untag yourself in unflattering photos and enable the setting that allows you to review tags people add to your posts before appearing in your newsfeed. If you have some friends with no regard for social etiquette, you may also want to enable the review feature to keep offensive comments from appearing on your wall.

If your job search is on the down-low, even if you are not Facebook friends with your boss, you may be a friend of a friend so there is always a possibility the word could get back. Double-check your Privacy Settings and take the extra few seconds when posting to use the audience selector. Create a Facebook List to group your business and networking contacts. Then, when you post something career-related, you can use the audience selector to share it with your professional list, and your Aunt Bessie won’t see the latest industry article that she has no interest in.

But keep in mind, good old Aunt Bessie may live next door to the CEO of a company that’s hiring for your position! The Status Update (to Friends and Family only if you’re currently employed) is the most obvious way to use Facebook in your job search. While you don’t want to overdo posting requests for career help, remember that out of sight is out of mind, especially in the fast-moving social feed.

Like the companies you are interested in working for on Facebook. Many savvy businesses are publicizing job openings across all social media.

Facebook’s Graph Search in the bar at the top of the site allows you to type in phrases such as “People who work at Facebook” or “Employers in San Antonio” to see what connections pop up. Not nearly as powerful as LinkedIn connections (and glitchy since a recent upgrade for mobile devices), this Facebook search may still yield some useful contacts to Friend or Message.

No matter the platform, social media can definitely be your friend in your job search. Next week, we’ll look at Twitter, Pinterest, YouTube, and some beyond-the-basic tips for LinkedIn.

Readers: Have you use Facebook to successfully land a new job? Tell us about it!

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Lessons on LinkedIn
Facebook – A Hiring Manager’s Best Friend
Run Better Meetings
Top 10 Interview Fails

Crimes and Misdemeanors

Dear, Anita,

I worked for a company for a total of 13 years, in 2010 I caught a charge that was a misdemeanor but still continue to work for the same company for 2 more years, then got fired for what they say was misconduct. Now I’m having problems trying to find a job, I’ve been applying for jobs ever since August of last year, hoping that something will fall through for me soon. Any advice for me?

Mug_Shot_iStock_000014052000_300pxDear, Miss Demeanor,

I get quite a few inquiries from job seekers with criminal records, both felonies and misdemeanors. (My post Disclosure of a DUI is one of my top 5 posts of all time.) It’s not surprising since nearly one-third of Americans have been arrested by age 23, a National Institute of Justice article observes. Criminal records range from one-time arrests where charges are dropped to serious repeat offenders, but most arrests are for relatively minor nonviolent offenses.

Since you have a misdemeanor on your record and you’ve been fired, that could count as two strikes against you in the eyes of a potential employer. Check out my blog Explaining Away “You’re Fired.” Since you worked at the company for 13 years, you must include it on your résumé and applications. The misdemeanor, however, may be a different story, depending on where you live. In recent years, some cities and states have prohibited public and sometimes private employers from asking for criminal histories. See the areas with “Ban the Box” policies at the National Employment Law Project (NELP). Positions in fields such as law enforcement, education, or care giving may require full criminal record disclosure, even misdemeanors. Be sure to read applications carefully; some only ask about felonies and not misdemeanors. Others may state a specific time period, such as “in the last seven years.” You don’t want to hide it, as it will come out if and when an employer performs a background check.

Police officer conducting sobriety testThe U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) offers guidelines for employers on consideration of job applicants’ criminal histories. While these are not policy or law (so not really enforceable in many states), the top three factors employers should consider are: 1) the nature and gravity of offense, 2) time lapse since the offense, and 3) the nature of the job. While an employer with an open accounting position should be hesitant to hire someone who, say, embezzled from a charity, a middle-aged candidate with one sole DUI from college days might fill the position without any issues. Try to apply to jobs that have nothing to do with your infraction (so no driving jobs if you have a DUI on record).

If your misdemeanor is really holding you back, consider having it expunged from your record (sealed from all but law enforcement). The procedure varies from state to state, so you may wish to consult an employment attorney.

Job Seekers: How have you gotten a job with a misdemeanor on your record?
Hiring Managers: Do you have any advice on how job seekers can best present any criminal records?

Do you have a job-related question? Ask Anita.

Subscribe to receive weekly emails with career tips and advice for job seekers, employed people, and managers and supervisors.

RELATED POSTS:
Finding Jobs for Ex-Felons
Disclosure of a DUI
Explaining Away “You’re Fired”
Time Theft: Is it Really a Crime?

Job Search is a Marathon, not a Sprint

Dear, Anita,

When I lost my job two months ago, I was all gung-ho, applying to everything and getting out there networking. Now, though, after so much rejection, I’m losing steam. How can I keep myself motivated?

Dear, Jockeying for Position,

Grief often follows losing a job. You’ve just experienced a major loss – certainly a loss of income, position, and security that may even lead to loss of self-esteem. While experts in the grieving process recommend not making major life changes during stressful times, you have to get yourself out there and find a new job! But it can be difficult for a person experiencing grief or stress (or both) to function at full capacity.

Call to mind the moral of “The Tortoise and The Hare” fable – slow and steady wins the race. While I certainly don’t advise that you lollygag in responding to job board postings and follow up with emails at a snail’s pace, I don’t want you to burn yourself out by sprinting. Fatigue is inevitable during high-intensity periods, but running a marathon requires the athlete to leave energy for the end of the race. As the entrants in the Select Staffing Veterans Day Marathon know, there are some tips for maintaining endurance that we can apply to your job search.

    • Diet: Stop eating ice cream straight out of the container and make healthy eating choices to maintain your vitality.
    • Protection: While wise marathon runners apply sunscreen, I hope that you have a safety net of a savings account in addition to unemployment benefits to guard against unexpected expenses that arise during the hopefully short period between jobs.
    • Breathe: Marathon runners have greater lung capacity than sprinters. When stressed, your body goes into fight or flight mode, and breathing becomes shallow. Take some deep breaths – here are a few exercises from integrative medicine physician Dr. Andrew Weil.
    • Join: Find the support group equivalent of a running club. There are online groups of similarly unemployed people, but a local face-to-face clique such as a Meetup Group may be more beneficial. Do a Google search with terms like “job,” “career,” “unemployed,” and “support.”
    • Plan: A physical training plan is crucial if you want to finish a marathon. Similarly, draft out your long-range job search efforts and calendar critical activities, and keep a log of your endeavors.
    • Rehearse: Nobody goes out to run 26.2 miles on their first run. Practice for your important competition with mock interviews. Watch for an upcoming blog about rehearsing for those tough job interview questions.
    • Visualize: Don’t underrate the power of mental preparation. Just as the runner envisions crossing the finish line, create a movie in your mind with you as the star, acing that grueling interview.
    • Fuel up: Long-distance runners take in fuel and hydrate during the race. Likewise, in your job search, refresh yourself. J.T. O’Donnell, CEO of CareerHMO, advises pleasant disruption techniques to change your brain pattern to get over your down days:

When you do land that post, celebrate making it over the finish line! It’s now time to start the real exercise of maintaining a long-running job.

Readers: How do you keep up the pace when you “hit the wall” in your job search?

Do you have a job-related question? Ask Anita.

Subscribe to receive weekly emails with career tips and advice for job seekers, employed people, and managers and supervisors.

RELATED POSTS:
Job Hunting Blues
No Longer “Enthused”
Understanding Unemployment

Tattoos & Interviews

Dear, Anita,

I want to get a tattoo, but people (mostly my mother!) have been telling me it’s not a good idea because it will limit my career. I have a degree in accounting, and after putting in some time at my current entry-level position, I do plan to look for a better job in the near future. Everyone has tattoos these days; surely employers are used to this by now. Do you think a tattoo will hurt my future?

Dear, Thinking of Inking,

Adult male adjusting necktie.While 20 years ago tattoos were generally perceived as a statement of rebellion, body art is now becoming more mainstream. A recent Pew Research Study shows that 40% of adults age 26-40 have at least one tattoo. However, only 14% of all Americans of all ages have a tattoo, so there’s a good chance one of those 86% who don’t will be your interviewer!

In a Salary.com survey, more than one-third of the respondents believe employees with tattoos and piercings reflect poorly with employers, and 42% responded that visible tattoos are always inappropriate at work. Interestingly, the study found the more educated you are, the less likely you are to have (or condone) tattoos.  There are also regional biases, with the west-south-central area of the U.S. (Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Louisiana) being the least tolerant of inked individuals. Hiring managers, while they themselves may not be biased, have to consider a tattooed employee’s interaction with customers, which could prevent you from getting a job.

Before you tattify, give careful consideration to the body art’s location. A tat on your lower back (known as a “tramp stamp” by the younger set) may never be seen in the course of a normal workday – unless you take a job as a lifeguard. Tattoo “sleeves,” however, are harder to cover day-to-day. If you are applying to a less-traditional company with a hip reputation, visible tattoos may not be as taboo.

To borrow a slogan from Internet marketing, “content is king.” Avoid a tattoo that portrays anything death-related (like skulls) as well as drug-related, racist, or sexually suggestive motifs. A butterfly may be more innocuous than a spider web tattooed on your neck. Check out this video from Global Image Group on preparing for a job interview with tattoos and piercings:

If you do pursue that tattoo, and later find it is limiting your career, tattoo removal is an option. But laser de-inking can be expensive. And while I surely can’t speak from experience, I hear that tattoo removal is more painful than the original process.

If I were you, I would be more concerned about boosting your skills and résumé, rather than your “street cred.”

Readers: What are your thoughts on tattoos in the workplace?

Have a question you would like to ask? Visit http://anitaclew.com/ask-anita/.

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I Resolve… to Get a New Job

Dear, Anita,

After being in a job that I’m not happy with, after much soul searching, I decided to quit and get a job I love!  It’s been a few months and I didn’t get many interviews during the holidays. Do you have any advice now that everyone is back to business? I’d love to start the new year out in a new job.

Dear, Shooting for the Stars,

I certainly don’t recommend quitting one job before getting another, but what’s done is done. Let’s start with a fresh approach.

Your CareerExplore Your Options.  What about your last job(s) made you unhappy? What tasks did you enjoy the most? To figure out what your dream job looks like, take advantage of some useful self-evaluation tools on  O*net OnLine, an occupation resource website sponsored by the US Department of Labor/ Employment and Training Administration.  Under Advanced Search, you can explore occupations based on your interests, skills, work values, and more. “Know thyself,” as the ancient Greek philosophers recommended. You don’t want to end up in another job where you’ll be unhappy again.

Résumé Review. Take a good look at your résumé. If it hasn’t been working so far, it may need a tune-up – minor or major. Review my post Reasons for No Résumé Response, have a colleague give you feedback, or bite the bullet and hire a professional résumé writing service like CareerPerfect to communicate your skills and experience in the best possible light.

Networking – Social and Traditional. If you’re an introvert, push yourself to do one networking task a week. Go to the chamber of commerce mixer or call an old colleague to ask if they know of any job openings. Haven’t completed your LinkedIn Profile? Checked the privacy settings on your Facebook page? Now is the time to make sure your social media presence is employer-friendly, with no embarrassing photos and off-color language. Google yourself; you may be surprised at the odd things that pop up. (Make sure your Amazon Wish List doesn’t contain anything weird!)

Learn a new job skill. If your newly discovered career goal requires upgraded skills, sign up for a class. If the training you need isn’t available at your local community college or job center, there are a myriad of options on the Internet.  While watching random software tip videos on YouTube can increase your knowledge, choosing a course that provides a certificate of completion you can tout on your résumé is preferable.

Create an action plan. You may have a long-term goal of becoming CEO of a company, but it probably won’t happen next week.  While long-range plans are important, it is equally important to break objectives into yearly, monthly, weekly, and daily goals. This segment from Kababayan Today gives some goal-setting tips for getting a job:

Readers: What is your work-related New Year’s Resolution? Do you plan to jump ship in 2014 and seek a new position? Take our poll above. 

Have a question you would like to ask? Visit http://anitaclew.com/ask-anita/.

Want to receive these tips by email? Simply subscribe for once-a-week advice for career success!

Job Seeking Spare Time

A reader writes:

Hi Anita,

I have been unemployed for 2 months and try as I may, I still am having trouble finding employment. I am starting to get extremely bored and the excess hours of the day are beginning to get to me. With the large amount of free time on my hands, what can I do to during the day that will have a positive impact on my job search and my day-to-day life?

Dear, Stuck With Too Much Spare Time,

Job HuntingBeing unemployed and having nothing to do are not as much fun as many people make it out to be. I bet for the first week or two, it feels like a nice vacation full of sleeping in, leisurely breakfasts, watching television all day, and kicking up your feet. But after a short while, those things you wished you could do while you were working are becoming unbearable and boring. If you are starting to feel down about yourself or feeling like there is no light at the end of the tunnel, I ask you to turn that frown upside down. It is time to start being proactive and getting your life back on track.

The first thing you need to do is set a schedule out for yourself. No more sleeping in until noon and watching television until the wee hours of the morning. Most people who are employed are up and out the door in time to be at work by 8 a.m. Now that you do not have a job, what do you think your full-time position is? You guessed it, JOB HUNTING! Immediately, go see my friends at Select Staffing and fill out an application. Chances are they will be able to enter you in their database and offer you advice on how to proceed with your search. You must dedicate at least 6 hours a day to searching for a job. That doesn’t mean just scouring the Internet; get out there and sell yourself. For tips and tricks on becoming a very successful networker, check out my post Networking Know-How.

Try to find a class in your area that will build your résumé and your skills. If you work in a warehouse, look into getting your certification in forklift driving. If you are in administrative or executive support, brush up your grammar and proofreading skills. Do something that will benefit you in the long run and help keep your brain from turning to mush.

Build your résumé while doing something good for others. Locate a charity whose cause is near and dear to your heart and start volunteering. This will give you satisfaction and look great to potential employers. Here you can gain Community Serviceprofessional and life skills, meet people that could help introduce you to new job openings, and also earn a great recommendation from your supervisor that can only shed a better light on your unemployment. I once volunteered at a local charity and after a few months of dedicated service, I was offered a paid position in their Career Center.

Surround yourself with positive EMPLOYED people. This is a very important piece of advice to follow. Typically, people who are unemployed will not be happy with their situations and will inevitably bring you down. They will be more likely to engage you in activities that do not mesh well with job hunting activities. People with jobs will be able to share advice and connect with other professionals, possibly resulting in your next job lead.

Cut out the junk food and take some time to get your body moving. Exercise is a great way to spend an hour of your day. Getting your blood pumping will increase your energy level and spread those happy endorphins through your body. It is proven to relieve stress and ward off depression. Healthy foods will give you more energy and make you feel much better, both physically and mentally. Remember if you put good in, you will get good out.

As tempting as it maybe, try to avoid reading the bad news about the job market and the economy; it will only bring you down. Switch over to reading uplifting books and inspiring stories to keep you in a chipper mood. Go by yourself to see movies that bring a smile to your face. It actually gives you a greater sense of independence. I definitely suggest you give it a try.

Set GoalsSet daily and weekly goals for yourself. These do not need to be huge or intricate. Day one can be as simple as waking up at 8 a.m. and apply to 3 viable jobs. If you do that every day for a week, you have 15 job applications and résumés out in the world. Now that is an accomplishment! As you achieve more, you will begin to feel better and more confident in your abilities. Just remember you won’t get anywhere without putting one foot in front of the other.

Now that I have given a few tips, I want to hear from my readers what they find to be the most important advice for keeping your sanity while seeking employment. What things did you do while you were searching for a job?

Take care until next time,

Anita

Disclaimer

Anita Clew's blog posts are intended for general guidance and should never be taken as legal advice. In all instances where harassment, inequity, or unfair treatment is believed to be present, please consult your HR Department or legal representation.
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