2014’s Top 10 Posts

Dear, Readers,

Many businesses conduct annual performance reviews. Why should I be exempt? (Gee, I’m as nervous as a long-tailed cat in a room full of rocking chairs.)

I took a moment to reexamine the questions asked and answered in 2014 to assess readership, analyze traffic, identify employment trends, and see which posts merit a second look.

Adult male adjusting necktie.And the most viewed articles of 2014, in order of popularity, are (drumroll, please)…

#1: Tattoos & Interviews
Before you spend that crisp $10 bill your Granny taped inside your Christmas card on skin art, read up on why tattoos could limit your career path.

#2: Applying for a Job When Not 100% Qualified
How many times have you read through an online job posting thinking I’m perfect for this… until you come to one or two bullet points that you don’t possess? See when to apply and when to not waste your time.

Woman with "Hired" Sign#3: Explaining Away “You’re Fired”
Should you include an employer from which you were fired (ahem, “relieved of your duties”) on applications and résumés? There’s no black and white answer.

#4: Top 10 Interview Fails
Top 10 lists must work; you’re reading one now! Read about interview faux pas and make a resolution to avoid committing even one of them at your next interview.

#5: How to Find Jobs Not Advertised on the Top Job Boards, Part 1
Think beyond CareerBuilder and Monster.com when it comes to searching for employment opportunities. Why Part 2 didn’t also make the top 10 list is a mystery. I suggest reading both.

Team Player#6: Top 10 Attitudes Employers Should Look For
While written in response to a question from a manager, job seekers can use this insight to make sure they convey these attributes in their résumé and cover letter and during interviews.

#7:  10 Commandments to Avoid Email Miscommunications: Tablet 1
Communication is 7% words, 38% tone of voice, and 55% body language. Since a whopping 93% of nonverbal cues are missing in emails, it’s no wonder there are so many misunderstandings! Use the tips in this post (and the rest in Tablet 2) to prevent slipups.

#8: No Payroll Deductions
Being paid under the table? Not receiving an itemized paycheck stub? Learn what’s legal and what’s not.Raising_Hand

#9: Salary Negotiation Mistakes
Avoid these 10 mistakes while asking for a raise or negotiating a starting salary.

#10: Applying to Internal Position
Here is advice on deciding if you want to move up (or laterally) within your company, and how to negotiate this potentially tricky scenario.

Readers: What was your favorite Anita Clew article this year?

Do you have a job-related question? Ask Anita. Your question might make next year’s Top 10 list!

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How to Find Jobs Not Advertised on the Top Job Boards, Part 2

Last week, I offered a half-dozen alternatives to finding positions on the online job boards. To review those ideas, click here. For more tips on how to find unadvertised jobs, read on…

business visionJob Fairs. Also known as a career expo, this is an event where employers and recruiters can meet job seekers. Be sure to bring copies of your résumé, and jot down notes on the business cards you collect so you can follow up. Set up a Google Alert so you won’t miss the next job fair scheduled in your region.

Internships & Volunteer Opportunities. Don’t think internships are just for recent graduates. If you are able to get an internship or volunteer to work for free (a radical concept, I know!) at your dream company, you’ll have your foot in the door when that paid position opens up. Even if your volunteer activities don’t lead to a position, you may meet some people who can help you further your career.

Take a Temp Job. If you just can’t work for free, join a temporary employment agency, such as The Select Family of Staffing Companies. You’ll be able to make some bill-paying money with assignments that last from a few days to a few months, in addition to keeping your skills from getting rusty. You may even be offered a permanent position. In this US News article, “10 Reasons to Take a Temporary Job,” point #1 notes that temporary work isn’t so temporary.

Word of Mouth. If you’ve been searching for a job for any length of time, you’re probably sick of the term “networking.”  Don’t let discouragement keep you from chamber of commerce mixers, service club meetings, and even ponying up the greens fees for a round of golf. For tips on networking, read my post Networking Know-How.

Hit the Bricks. Whether you want to find a job in a downtown boutique or in the financial district of your city, dress for the part, pop some freshly printed résumés in your satchel, and go hunting on foot.  While higher-level jobs don’t often advertise with a “Help Wanted” sign in the window, chatting up the receptionist in an office suite building may lead to some inside information. If you ask to speak to a company’s hiring manager, you may be able to get 10 minutes of his or her time, even without an appointment.

You never know. Your next job may be hiding in plain sight.

Readers: Have you ever landed an “unadvertised” job? We’d love to hear your story.

Do you have a question for Anita Clew? Visit http://anitaclew.com/ask-anita/.

Subscribe to receive weekly emails with career tips and advice for job seekers, employed people, and managers and supervisors.

How to Find Jobs Not Advertised on the Top Job Boards, Part 1

Dear, Anita,

I have resumes on different job boards on the Internet. I apply to positions I find posted and get back that my resume has been submitted. I don’t get a job offer from it. I have been looking for a job for 1-1/2 years. What am I doing wrong?

Dear, Bored with Boards,

Frustrated Woman at Computer With Stack of PaperWhile job seekers must steadfastly apply to positions posted on the top online job boards – Monster.com, CareerBuilder, Indeed, and the like – this should not be the only tactic in an all-out job search.  I have seen statistics that claim 40% to 80% of jobs are unadvertised (depending on if the stats are based on “paid” advertising in newspapers and on online job boards, versus publicized with no additional cost outlay.) Here are other places to find job opportunities:

LinkedIn. While you’re updating your profile, don’t forget to check the Jobs tab on LinkedIn, which hosts paid advertisements for open positions. You can set up an e-mail job alert for the industry and geographic area of interest. (For those of you currently employed, not to worry – your job search activity is private so your boss won’t see it.)

Craigslist. In some areas of the country, the free job listings on Craigslist are quite effective for businesses and job seekers. Just don’t be tempted to go down the rabbit hole by perusing the personals or “for sale” ads.

Company Website Careers Page.  Make a list of companies in your area that you would like to work for and check out their websites. Many companies have pages on their websites devoted to career opportunities, which you’ll want to bookmark and check often. For a life hack on how to search multiple companies’ career pages using a Google trick, check out Option Three in the How to Find Unadvertised Jobs blog from Glassdoor.com.

Social Media. Savvy businesses maximize their Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn status updates, and other social media accounts to publicize for free their current job openings. Some mid-size and larger companies even have unique social media accounts devoted to careers and recruiting, separate from their customer or end-user accounts.

College Career Centers. While you are still a student, be sure to take full advantage of your college’s career center. In addition to maintaining lists of job openings and internships from local employers that may not be posted elsewhere, the staff at these university job offices can help you with your résumé, coach you for your interviews, or even cultivate letters of recommendation for you.

Government Job Resource Center.  To find local resources, you may have to think like a thesaurus when you do your online search. Government resources can go by many names, from workforce resource center, career services, employment center, job network… the list goes on. Services can be provided under the auspices of local governments to state economic development departments.  If you’re not a master-Googler, start at the national American Job Center for links to some resources.

Check out Part 2 of this article next week, for five more alternatives to job boards.

Readers: What sources, besides the online job boards, have proved most fruitful in your job search?

Do you have a question for Anita Clew? Visit http://anitaclew.com/ask-anita/.

Subscribe to receive weekly emails with career tips and advice for job seekers, employed people, and managers and supervisors.

Disclaimer

Anita Clew's blog posts are intended for general guidance and should never be taken as legal advice. In all instances where harassment, inequity, or unfair treatment is believed to be present, please consult your HR Department or legal representation.
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