Lack of Training

Dear Anita,

I’m in HR and just have to vent. I get so many résumés for open positions from people who don’t qualify even remotely. Can you please tell job seekers without the required experience not to waste my time?

Infographic-1-Lack-of-Experience-LGDear, Not Impressed,

A recent American Staffing Association (ASA) survey found that unemployed adults looking for work say that lack of experience is the main obstacle that prevents them from finding a job. (Really, we needed a survey to figure that out?) But the workforce survey goes further: 82% of unemployed job seekers think training would increase their chances of receiving job offers. And nearly nine out of 10 aspirants would be willing to try a new field if training were offered.

So, employers, do you have a training program for those hard-to-fill positions? Or perhaps you have high turnover in a particular role. This may be an indication that the instruction provided for that job title is not up to snuff. It’s not enough for the HR department to fill chairs with warm bodies; you want those bodies to flourish in the role, both for their own personal growth and for the company’s betterment.

If your business has perpetually open positions with no qualified applicants, consider cultivating “home-grown” employees. Convince your local community college to provide classes that your company would find helpful for future applicants.

Now, let me scold job seekers a bit. If you come across as a lackluster candidate to hiring managers, it’s in your power to improve your image. Don’t wait for future employers to train you. Proactively seek out professional development opportunities, whether it’s online or at your local chamber of commerce, free or paid out of your own pocket. You’ll be able to beef up your résumé’s “Advanced Training” or “Continuing Education” section, and show that you have a drive to succeed.

Readers: Let’s dream a little. If you could change careers with full training provided, what field would you enter?

Do you have a job-related question? Ask Anita.

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RELATED POSTS:
Applying for a Job When Not 100% Qualified
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Back to Class

Great Questions to Ask During Interviews

Dear Anita,

I’m 72 and the first job I interviewed for was 2 years ago and I was hired on the spot! For those searching for a job, I recommend showing how excited you are at the interview, and that you first learn a few things about the prospective employer. It shows that you aren’t just randomly going from door-to-door!

Be energetic and positive. Ask questions like… “How long have you [the interviewer] worked here?” or “What is the best thing you like about your company?” That way you will learn something and it gives you a chance to compose yourself.

Interview_Question_000019402901Dear Spot On,

Congrats on acing your interview! Thanks for sharing your winning strategy. Many people forget to prepare for that final interviewer’s inquiry, “Do you have any questions for me?” Here is a list of great questions to impress your potential employer.

  • Do you have any reservations about my qualifications? (If yes, this give you a second chance to toot your own horn and change their mind.)
  • Can you tell me about the team I’d be working with? (Gain insight into the coworkers you would deal with on a daily basis.)
  • Who has formerly held the position? (Did they retire? Were they fired? If so, why?)
  • What is a typical [day, week, month, or year] like for a person in this job?
  • What is the biggest problem currently facing your staff? (Try to show how you could help solve this problem.)
  • What constitutes success in this position? (Will you have a fighting chance to flourish?)
  • What are the prospects for growth in this job? (Show you’re in it for the long term.)

And finally, don’t forget to ask the all-important:

  • What is the next step in the hiring process?

For even more queries, check out job-hunt.com’s 45 Questions to Ask in Your Job Interview.

Readers: What is your favorite question to ask during a job interview?

Do you have a job-related question? Ask Anita.

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Attitude: It’s Contagious!

Dear Anita,

I have a negative employee that I wish would get the flu and stay home from work! Her cynical attitude and pessimism is really bringing the team down. She does get her work done, but not without complaining. Any ideas on how to manage this “Gloomy Gussie?”

Donkey with umbrellaDear Eyeore Encourager,

An employee with a negative attitude can quickly become an emotional drain on the more positive team members. Misery loves company, so you are wise to nip negative behavior in the bud.

Chances are, your Gloomy Gussie’s attitude is a habit. She may not even realize she is coming across as a wet blanket. Here are some ways to encourage more positivity at work:

    • Smile at her (even if you don’t feel like it). Smiling is contagious. Try to beat the statistics: 30% of people smile five to 20 times a day at the office, and 28% smile over 20 times per day at work.
    • Encourage your entire team to find solutions instead of making complaints. In meetings, when Eyeore pooh-poohs an idea, turn the tables and ask how it could work.
    • Give clear feedback – and potential consequences – in one-on-one meetings. Be sure to let Sad Sally know that while her work output is satisfactory, a positive attitude is just as important.
    • Listen. It’s hard not to tune out Negative Nellie when she starts whining. But if you can get to the root of the dissatisfaction, you may just find the cure.
    • Praise progress. Be sure to catch her whenever she makes an effort, no matter how small, to be positive to encourage more of the desired behavior.
    • Keep your own attitude in check. When interacting with Pessimistic Patty, don’t roll your eyes (even inwardly but especially to other subordinates).
    • If things don’t improve, you may have to let this bad apple go. Just be sure to document specific examples of negativity affecting performance as “attitude problem” is too subjective, suggests this Houston Chronicle article, “How to Fire People with Bad Attitudes.”

“A healthy attitude is contagious, but don’t wait to catch it from others. Be a carrier.” Tom Stoppard, playwright

Readers: Are you the carrier of an Eyeore or Tigger attitude at work?

Do you have a job-related question? Ask Anita.

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Sharing the Pain

Dear Anita,

My job is the biggest royal pain. Can you help me get a better one?

Woman in painDear, Complaint Queen,

According to research conducted by SERMO, yours truly actually has one of the top 10 most painful jobs. Yes, that’s right. Writers and journalists rank up there with construction workers, truck drivers, and those on the production line. (Mechanics, gardeners/landscapers, athletes, firefighters, lawyers, and IT professionals round out the top 10.)

But instead of focusing on our pain on the job, try targeting a hiring manager’s daily discomforts – and how you, above all others, can help relieve his or her troubles. A few years ago, Liz Ryan, CEO of Human Workplace, trademarked the idea of a Pain Letter. This is the opposite of the generic cover letter (no more “Dear HR, I saw your ad and am applying for the open position. Blah, blah, blah.”).

The first step in writing a Pain Letter is to research the company. Use LinkedIn to find the hiring manager’s name.

Secondly, congratulate the manager and/or the company for a recent accomplishment (which may also be gleaned from LinkedIn or Google research). Ryan calls this the “Hook.”

Next, determine what keeps this manager up at night, and outline the “Pain Hypothesis.” Ryan gave this example for an imaginary Payroll Specialist in Forbes:

I can imagine that hiring as many people as you are, keeping tabs on payroll issues might be a constant challenge. With regulations constantly changing, it’s not easy to keep everyone paid correctly and well-informed in a growing company.

Then, include your “Dragon-Slaying Story,” describing specifically how you handled similar pain in your current or previous position.

When I ran the payroll system at Angry Chocolates, I kept the payroll accurate and in compliance and answered dozens of employee questions every day while we grew from 15 to 650 staff members.

Keep the letter brief, closing simply:

If payroll accuracy and advice to your team is on your radar screen, I’d love to chat when it’s convenient. All the best, Nancy Drew

Readers: How do you focus on alleviating the hiring manager’s business pains in your cover letter?

Do you have a job-related question? Ask Anita.

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Disclaimer

Anita Clew's blog posts are intended for general guidance and should never be taken as legal advice. In all instances where harassment, inequity, or unfair treatment is believed to be present, please consult your HR Department or legal representation.
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