Rules for Requesting R and R

A reader writes…

Hi, Anita,

I am looking into taking a vacation this fall with my husband to celebrate our 15th wedding anniversary. For the dates we want to travel, I will need to take off 5 days from work. I am always nervous to ask for time off for appointments so a whole week has become very daunting. What can I do to ease my stress and get the time off with my hubby?

Dear Getaway Gal,

Every once in a while, you may run across the need to ask your boss for some time off from work. We all need a few days off to spend with family and friends, or a week off to celebrate an anniversary, or just some time away from work to recharge our batteries.  For some people, this is stress free and a no-brainer; for others, it can be full of anxiety and nervousness.

Couple_On VacationTo start, it is always best to present your request in writing. Many companies will have a template available for you, but if not, you can create your own or use a template such as this one provided by Microsoft Office. Fill this form out with your signature and date, and ask that your supervisor do the same, noting his or her approval or rejection. It will be helpful in case a discrepancy arises and your time off is contested.

Before you ask for time off, make sure you are prepared to answer any questions that may arise during the discussion with your boss. Evaluate and understand the current status of projects and your general workload.  Be mindful of the impact that your absence may have on your work and on those on your team.

Reassure your manager that you are prepared to take on any negative impacts that may arise as a result of your time off. It would be helpful to work out a plan with a co-worker to assist you when you are gone in exchange for helping them in the future. Try your best to come up with a great solution or an acceptable alternative course of action for issues that may occur Suitcaseswhile you are away.

Be aware of the amount of time that your employer has allotted you for vacation/sick days. Typically, it is not an issue for an employee to take time off as long as it is covered by the time given in your employment contract. If your need exceeds this amount, be prepared to explain clearly why you need extra time off, but remember that you do not need to expose all the details about your absence. You are entitled to maintain your privacy.

Finally, follow up! Just because you discussed it, got approval, and have it set in stone on your end, it can’t hurt to remind your supervisor as the date approaches. If you have a calendar that is shared with your boss, send an appointment request to be added to their calendar. Also one week prior, send out an email to your co-workers informing them of your upcoming absence to allow them time to get input or materials from you before you leave.

Readers- What are some issues you have run into when requesting time off? Was the stress of coming back from vacation worth the time off? I would love to hear from you.

Have a question you would like to ask? Visit http://anitaclew.com/ask-anita/.

Looking forward to hearing from you!

-Anita

3 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Jenny
    Nov 24, 2012 @ 08:12:58

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  2. pravinchn
    Jul 24, 2012 @ 10:00:23

    Reblogged this on pravinchn.

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Disclaimer

Anita Clew's blog posts are intended for general guidance and should never be taken as legal advice. In all instances where harassment, inequity, or unfair treatment is believed to be present, please consult your HR Department or legal representation.
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