Boss Personality Types

A reader writes…

Anita,
My direct supervisor (whom I worked with for over 6 years) just retired. While I’m happy for her, I am feeling uneasy about the new guy taking over her role. She was super easygoing and personable – the complete OPPOSITE of the new management style that’s about to begin. What are some tips on being able to read people and adapt to different personalities?

Dear, “Chameleon,”

It’s a fact of life that people are different and, as people, we need to know how to adapt and adjust to one another. For some, it’s all about being personable and touchy-feely about stuff. For others, it’s all about the facts and no-nonsense. Though it seems you had a great working relationship with your previous boss, there’s a good chance that you’ll be just fine with this newcomer. Remember, you shouldn’t judge a book by its cover. Give your new supervisor a chance to settle into his role, become more acquainted, and establish himself… so you can accurately “read him” and adjust your approach and working relationship accordingly.

Here’s an interesting article I found on Monster.com that addresses “How to Deal with Five Boss Personality Types:” http://career-advice.monster.com/in-the-office/workplace-issues/boss-personality-types-hot-jobs/article.aspx?WT.mc_n=yta_fpt_article_5_boss_types. Do you see your new boss in any of these characters?

Readers, what type of boss do you work with? Any good stories to share from past jobs?
Please post your thoughts and comments here!

Anita  

9 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Karen
    Nov 27, 2011 @ 09:30:04

    Talk about new supervisors… How about one who received death threats from his former employees! I was in a secretarial pool and, as I was the newest, was assigned to him when he arrived in the office. I was warned he was TERRIBLE and IMPOSSIBLE TO WORK WITH and I would probably want to quit. The first day he called me into the office and placed a huge binder down in front of me. He said, “This is the rule book of the company. Learn it. If you can find it in the rule book, you can do it – I don’t care what it is. If you want something or need something, look in the book. If it says you can have it, get it. You have two weeks to ask any question – for the first two weeks there are no dumb questions. If you don’t ask, that’s dumb. People hate me. I don’t care. Follow these simple steps, we’ll get along fine.” Well, we got along just fine. I didn’t quit, but I did see the death threats.

    Reply

  2. ROBINDUNLAP
    Nov 08, 2011 @ 15:50:58

    I AM STILL LOOKING FOR WORK, I AM NOT SURE IF IT IS BECAUSE WHEN I INTERVEIW I TEND TO JOKE A BIT..I DO THAT ALOT WHEN I AM NERVOUS..I TRY NOT TO BUT I CANT HELP MYSELF..

    Reply

  3. m.capriola
    Nov 07, 2011 @ 08:14:33

    I went thru several supervisor changes during the nearly 2 decades at my old job. As long as the job was getting done properly and on a timely basis, I didn’t have any problems with my supervisor.

    Amusing sidebar: At one point we were still using an old Microline printer for a special report. I put an order in for a new ribbon. The new person in Receiving told my boss that she didn’t understand why I would need this ribbon. My supervisor replied, “I don’t know either. But whatever Michael asks for, just give it to him.”

    If you know more about your job duties than anyone else, including your boss, you become a valued employee.

    Reply

  4. Michele Vics
    Nov 04, 2011 @ 07:46:52

    I’ve worked for a bank for 10 years with management structure shifts as frequent as we change underwear. All I could do was keep a low profile while I feel the new supervisor out. As long as I keep working as hard as I can, be myself, things should be fine. Can’t go wrong with a little cooperation.

    Reply

  5. Mike Carver
    Nov 02, 2011 @ 04:59:21

    Do your job the best way that you know how, just like you have been doing. He will see that he can learn things from you. And that is a good thing. Right.

    Reply

  6. Officegirl Friday
    Nov 01, 2011 @ 13:30:51

    i was once in this same position, a supervisor that we had, had for 4 years since the beginning of the company moved on, and the company was woman based and we ended up with a male supervisor, new from not within the company, but you know what it worked out, he sat back and watched us work before he suggested changes, he figured out who was working and who was skating by and those that were really working he helped better their people skills and working skills, moved things around in the department, that helped. Even though it looked like a bad situation, it wasn’t, so give the new supervisor a chance. you just may learn something new. unfortunately after 6 months he got a super offer in another city and left our company, but i learned alot in those 6 months.

    Reply

  7. Cromaxgal
    Nov 01, 2011 @ 10:50:29

    This is a better example of personality types. http://www.discinsights.com/whatisdisc.asp

    I was blessed to be in a group of people that were given this type of testing and it taught me how to reach future bosses and my then current boss.

    Reply

  8. Alex gonzalez jr
    Nov 01, 2011 @ 09:04:02

    Well im still without a job I have been declined for a job 3 times already and havent heard from other jobs I dont know what to do anymore

    Reply

  9. LEE ZIMBLER
    Nov 01, 2011 @ 08:20:39

    JUST BE PATIENT WITH THE NEW SUPERVISOR.EVERYTHING WILL WORK OUT. JUST DO YOU JOB AS YOU DID BEFORE.YOU NEVER KNOW HE MIGHT LEARN SOMETHING FROM YOU.

    Reply

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Disclaimer

Anita Clew's blog posts are intended for general guidance and should never be taken as legal advice. In all instances where harassment, inequity, or unfair treatment is believed to be present, please consult your HR Department or legal representation.
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