One Long Job on Résumé


Dear, Anita,

After 27 years with the same company, I have been laid off after a merger. The problems is I have a very short résumé, since I’ve been at this job most of my career! How should I handle this?

OneDear, Long-Term Lola,

It used to be that people stayed at the same company long enough to get the gold watch at retirement. In our more mobile society, there has been a definite shift away from job longevity. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, workers have been with their current employer an average of 4.6 years. (I think there are some leftovers in my freezer older than that!)

First, I’m going to assume that your latest position is not the same one you started with at your (former) company. Break out each job title and list chronologically with the most recent first. You have a résumé advantage that serial job-hoppers don’t. You can go into much more detail about each position and what you accomplished there to move you up to the next level. Give measurable examples whenever possible (e.g., promoted to Sales Manager after increasing personal sales 37%). It’s important for a potential employer to see that you have not been stagnant before being thrown back into the labor pool.

If you have attended seminars over the years or received on-the-job training and cross-training, list all the credits and certificates that you have accumulated. Speaking of skills, this may be another subhead for you to add to your résumé template. List all the computer programs in which you are proficient, as well other industry-specific processes and procedures with which you are familiar.

If, by chance, you have been in the same position since Day 1, you’ll have to employ a tactic I recommend to newly minted graduates, and include extracurricular and volunteer activities on your résumé (see my blog, Including Volunteer Work In Your Resume).  In fact, if you are feeling your résumé is still a little thin, by all means mention that you organize the annual fund-raiser at your kids’ school or maintained the bookkeeping records for your local animal charity.

Take the opportunity to brag about your tenure in your previous position in your cover letter. Instead of apologizing for a lack of résumé bullet points under “Experience,” celebrate your longevity! Emphasize your loyalty, your stability, and your reliability. I am confident that the sum total of these character virtues is still sought after in the job marketplace.

Readers: How have you addressed working for only a few companies in your résumé and your job search?

Have a question you would like to ask? Visit http://anitaclew.com/ask-anita/.

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10 Commandments to Avoid Email Miscommunications: Tablet 2


Dear, Readers,

Last week, Wrong Wavelength wrote in about a misunderstood email she sent to her supervisor. Follow my 10 Commandments to Avoid Email Miscommunications to keep you out of hot water. Review Commandments 1-5 here.

Even the most clearly worded directives can sometimes be misunderstood. A cake decorator took her instructions too literally. Source: www.masalatime.com

Even the most clearly worded directives can sometimes be misunderstood. A cake decorator took her instructions too literally. Source: http://www.masalatime.com

6. Avoid ambiguity. For example, you write, “We’re losing sales on our XYZ product. I wonder what our competitors are charging.” Does that mean you want the recipient to research the competitors’ prices? Make sure you are not asking rhetorical questions in email (“Why don’t you… ?”). If you are taking excessive care not to offend, the recipient may not even notice the constructive criticisms couched in our communiqués. A phrase like “There’s a problem with …” or a polite instruction like “Could you please correct… ?” is more to the point. If you’re giving bad news, use simple, sympathetic language, like “I’m afraid…”

7. Ditch the demands. On the opposite end of the beating around the bush is coming across as hard-nosed. Instead of “I want you to explain ABC,” it’s better to say, “We need to discuss ABC.” Common courtesy goes a long way.  Even an innocuous reply of “Fine” is subject to interpretation. Revisit drama class and read that one word with the following emotions: angry, happy, satisfied, bored, and exasperated. To be safe, add a few extra words (“That sounds fine to me”) or rephrase.

8. Add a little emotion.  Even at work, show a little feeling with your words, from excitement to sympathy. While trying to motivate, though, don’t overdo the exclamation points. One per paragraph is my rule of thumb. It’s my opinion that adding emoticons to internal (non-client) emails is acceptable – in moderation. But don’t think that adding a wink makes it okay to forward that off-color joke.

9. Use your CC wisely. While it’s important for anyone with “need to know” status to be included in the information loop, use the CC wisely so as not to inundate your co-workers with unnecessary emails. If you are reprimanding someone in a CCed email, the whole department (usually) does not have to know about it. Likewise, if you are the person to respond to an email with a lot of people CCed, consider whether or not they need to be included on the response. Don’t just hit “Reply” when “Reply to All” is more appropriate. It’s frustrating for the originator of the email to have to keep adding the CCed recipients back in every time the conversation shifts back and forth.

10. Reply thoroughly. My personal pet peeve is sending an email with multiple questions and getting a response to only one. When writing the original email, if you number your questions, you’ll have a better chance of getting all of them answered.

Before you hit “send,” take a moment to review your email. Read it aloud in your head in the opposite tone you intend (say, sarcastic or angry for most business email). You may be surprised at how your innocent email could be taken the wrong way by a colleague. If you just can’t get the tone right, pick up the phone for a 38% better chance of being understood.

Readers: Have you ever had one of your emails misunderstood? Feel free to post your example in the comments!

Need some job advice? Anita Clew is happy to help. Click here to Ask Anita.

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10 Commandments to Avoid Email Miscommunications: Tablet 1


Dear, Anita,

I work remotely and sent this email to my boss. He got very upset and I don’t know why.

Hi [Boss], I haven’t been successful reaching you by phone, so I’ll try email instead. Could you please forward me the newest statistics for the [project] that I requested last week?

I almost lost my job because he said I was being insubordinate. What do you think, Anita? Did I do anything wrong?

Dear, Wrong Wavelength,

I recently had a text message misunderstanding with a family member, so your question really hits home. It sounds like you accidentally offended your boss when you insinuated (in his mind) that he does not return phone calls and unprofessionally ignores requests.

Albert Mehrabian, a 1960s researcher, found that communication is 7 percent verbal (words), 38 percent tone of voice, and 55 percent body language. Since a whopping 93% of nonverbal cues are missing in electronic communications, it’s no wonder there are so many crossed wires!

To avoid misunderstandings – or worse, offense – keep my Ten Commandments of Email Communication in mind. We’ll start with five this week, and bring the second electronic stone tablet next week.

1. Keep it short. Nobody has time for long rambling emails, and you may lose your audience before you get to the point. Summarize briefly, while still relaying relevant information. Use attachments to supplement your email outline.

Lets_Eat_Grandma_Save_Lives_Meme2. Check spelling, grammar, and punctuation. A simple mistake could change your message dramatically – especially for poor grandma.

3. Be clear and avoid double negatives. Look at this muddle with a quadruple negative: “Unless you fail to inform us in advance of your inability to attend the training event, you will not be billed for those presentations which you cannot avoid missing.” Will I or won’t I be charged for the event if I don’t cancel?

4. Be specific. If you add a comment or opinion about a statement in an email, make sure it’s clear which point you are remarking on. Sometimes, it is helpful to respond under each statement or question, and change the text color of your responses.

5. Be careful with humor. Your tongue-in-cheek sarcasm may just come across as just plain mean when not accompanied by your charming smirk. Electronic joking is best employed with co-workers you know quite well.

Stay tuned for email commandments 6 through 10 next week!

Readers: Here’s a fun challenge for you! Rewrite the email excerpt in Wrong Wavelength’s question to improve the tone and avoid misunderstandings. Post your best rephrasing by leaving a reply in the comments.

Tattoos & Interviews


Dear, Anita,

I want to get a tattoo, but people (mostly my mother!) have been telling me it’s not a good idea because it will limit my career. I have a degree in accounting, and after putting in some time at my current entry-level position, I do plan to look for a better job in the near future. Everyone has tattoos these days; surely employers are used to this by now. Do you think a tattoo will hurt my future?

Dear, Thinking of Inking,

Adult male adjusting necktie.While 20 years ago tattoos were generally perceived as a statement of rebellion, body art is now becoming more mainstream. A recent Pew Research Study shows that 40% of adults age 26-40 have at least one tattoo. However, only 14% of all Americans of all ages have a tattoo, so there’s a good chance one of those 86% who don’t will be your interviewer!

In a Salary.com survey, more than one-third of the respondents believe employees with tattoos and piercings reflect poorly with employers, and 42% responded that visible tattoos are always inappropriate at work. Interestingly, the study found the more educated you are, the less likely you are to have (or condone) tattoos.  There are also regional biases, with the west-south-central area of the U.S. (Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Louisiana) being the least tolerant of inked individuals. Hiring managers, while they themselves may not be biased, have to consider a tattooed employee’s interaction with customers, which could prevent you from getting a job.

Before you tattify, give careful consideration to the body art’s location. A tat on your lower back (known as a “tramp stamp” by the younger set) may never be seen in the course of a normal workday – unless you take a job as a lifeguard. Tattoo “sleeves,” however, are harder to cover day-to-day. If you are applying to a less-traditional company with a hip reputation, visible tattoos may not be as taboo.

To borrow a slogan from Internet marketing, “content is king.” Avoid a tattoo that portrays anything death-related (like skulls) as well as drug-related, racist, or sexually suggestive motifs. A butterfly may be more innocuous than a spider web tattooed on your neck. Check out this video from Global Image Group on preparing for a job interview with tattoos and piercings:

If you do pursue that tattoo, and later find it is limiting your career, tattoo removal is an option. But laser de-inking can be expensive. And while I surely can’t speak from experience, I hear that tattoo removal is more painful than the original process.

If I were you, I would be more concerned about boosting your skills and résumé, rather than your “street cred.”

Readers: What are your thoughts on tattoos in the workplace?

Have a question you would like to ask? Visit http://anitaclew.com/ask-anita/.

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Career Change to STEM


Dear, Anita,

I understand women and men had been created similarly, but one particular question I could never uncover the solution to is why you can find a lot more males functioning as doctors, engineers, and scientists? The ratio of male: females is about ninety-nine to one. Why is this, and how can I as a woman change careers to get into one of these fields?

Woman DoctorDear, Marie Curie Wanna-Be,

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), 34.3% of U.S. physicians are female, so women are gaining ground in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering & Math) fields. As to the why, we could discuss this for hours. There is an interesting nondiscriminatory take on the issue in this recent MSN News article: http://news.msn.com/science-technology/why-are-women-underrepresented-in-science-and-math-careers.

The days of working for one company in one career until you get a gold watch at retirement are long gone. But how many times do people change careers in their lifetime? The BLS estimates the average person holds 11.3 jobs from age 18-46. Of course, a change of jobs doesn’t necessarily mean a total change in your career choice.

But let’s talk nuts and bolts.  Making a drastic career change can be challenging, and double that if you’ve got kids to feed and bills to pay. So be as certain as you can be that this new career is something you will be passionate about, because you’ll need that enthusiasm to get you through the tough times.

Woman ScientistFirst, for a career in the fields you mentioned – medical, engineering, or scientific – you’ll need additional education. You didn’t mention your age (and it would be rude of me to ask!), but many of these fields take advanced degrees. I hope you have your bachelor’s behind you, or the process will take many more years. (Check out my past blog, Advanced Degrees While Employed, for tips on balancing work, life, and school.) You’ll need to narrow down your career choices to hone in on the focus for your educational efforts… and dollars.

Speaking of that, are you prepared to invest in your career change?  If you have previous student loans, are you willing to go into more debt? As an alternative to a full-blown master’s degree, you may look into certificate programs in the STEM fields (medical assistant, drafting, Microsoft certification, etc.), which may be completed more quickly and for a lower cost.

We’ve all heard stories about accountants turned bakers, and lawyers trying their hand at stand-up comedy. However, the easiest career changes are those in which you can transfer some of your current skills into your new path.  But don’t let that discourage you. For more inspiration, check out this NASA video:

Reader: Have you ever changed careers? What is the best piece of advice you can offer?

Do you have a question for Anita Clew? Visit http://anitaclew.com/ask-anita/.

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Top 10 Attitudes Employers Should Look For


Dear, Anita,

I’m currently looking for a key staff member. I have several résumés that are pretty equal as far as skill sets are concerned. How do I decide among a handful of qualified candidates?

Dear, Analysis Paralysis,

More and more employers are realizing that you should “hire for attitude, then train for skill.” The maxim is credited to Herb Kelleher, former CEO of Southwest Airlines. When Kelleher became chairman in 1978, he placed humor at the top of his hiring criteria, and more than 30 years later, you can see that prized attitude in this Southwest steward:

According to my friends at the Power Training Institute, here are the 10 attitudes employers should look for in a star performer:

1. Find a learner who consistently wants to improve and grow.

2. Hire a listener who will talk only after they’ve listened first.

3. Employ a solver who does not just see problems, but finds solutions.

4. Discover an appreciator who will thank and encourage others.

5. Find a communicator who will speak effectively, not just someone who likes to talk.

6. Appoint a thinker who always searches for better, more efficient ways to do things.

7. Hire a planner who can set and meet deadlines.

Team Player

8. Select a motivator who has enthusiasm that will influence others.

9. Employ a team player who can work well with others.

10. Find an acceptor who takes responsibility for their own results.

Nordstrom’s is another company that hires for character. “We can hire nice people and teach them to sell,” Bruce Nordstrom says, “but we can’t hire salespeople and teach them to be nice.” While you should not throw out the skill requirements when hiring for every position (brain surgery comes to mind), you can hire better employees when you take their mental outlook into account.

Managers: Would you rather have a more skilled employee or one with a can-do attitude?

Need some job advice? Anita Clew is happy to help. Click here to Ask Anita.

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How to Find Jobs Not Advertised on the Top Job Boards, Part 2


Last week, I offered a half-dozen alternatives to finding positions on the online job boards. To review those ideas, click here. For more tips on how to find unadvertised jobs, read on…

business visionJob Fairs. Also known as a career expo, this is an event where employers and recruiters can meet job seekers. Be sure to bring copies of your résumé, and jot down notes on the business cards you collect so you can follow up. Set up a Google Alert so you won’t miss the next job fair scheduled in your region.

Internships & Volunteer Opportunities. Don’t think internships are just for recent graduates. If you are able to get an internship or volunteer to work for free (a radical concept, I know!) at your dream company, you’ll have your foot in the door when that paid position opens up. Even if your volunteer activities don’t lead to a position, you may meet some people who can help you further your career.

Take a Temp Job. If you just can’t work for free, join a temporary employment agency, such as The Select Family of Staffing Companies. You’ll be able to make some bill-paying money with assignments that last from a few days to a few months, in addition to keeping your skills from getting rusty. You may even be offered a permanent position. In this US News article, “10 Reasons to Take a Temporary Job,” point #1 notes that temporary work isn’t so temporary.

Word of Mouth. If you’ve been searching for a job for any length of time, you’re probably sick of the term “networking.”  Don’t let discouragement keep you from chamber of commerce mixers, service club meetings, and even ponying up the greens fees for a round of golf. For tips on networking, read my post Networking Know-How.

Hit the Bricks. Whether you want to find a job in a downtown boutique or in the financial district of your city, dress for the part, pop some freshly printed résumés in your satchel, and go hunting on foot.  While higher-level jobs don’t often advertise with a “Help Wanted” sign in the window, chatting up the receptionist in an office suite building may lead to some inside information. If you ask to speak to a company’s hiring manager, you may be able to get 10 minutes of his or her time, even without an appointment.

You never know. Your next job may be hiding in plain sight.

Readers: Have you ever landed an “unadvertised” job? We’d love to hear your story.

Do you have a question for Anita Clew? Visit http://anitaclew.com/ask-anita/.

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How to Find Jobs Not Advertised on the Top Job Boards, Part 1


Dear, Anita,

I have resumes on different job boards on the Internet. I apply to positions I find posted and get back that my resume has been submitted. I don’t get a job offer from it. I have been looking for a job for 1-1/2 years. What am I doing wrong?

Dear, Bored with Boards,

Frustrated Woman at Computer With Stack of PaperWhile job seekers must steadfastly apply to positions posted on the top online job boards – Monster.com, CareerBuilder, Indeed, and the like – this should not be the only tactic in an all-out job search.  I have seen statistics that claim 40% to 80% of jobs are unadvertised (depending on if the stats are based on “paid” advertising in newspapers and on online job boards, versus publicized with no additional cost outlay.) Here are other places to find job opportunities:

LinkedIn. While you’re updating your profile, don’t forget to check the Jobs tab on LinkedIn, which hosts paid advertisements for open positions. You can set up an e-mail job alert for the industry and geographic area of interest. (For those of you currently employed, not to worry – your job search activity is private so your boss won’t see it.)

Craigslist. In some areas of the country, the free job listings on Craigslist are quite effective for businesses and job seekers. Just don’t be tempted to go down the rabbit hole by perusing the personals or “for sale” ads.

Company Website Careers Page.  Make a list of companies in your area that you would like to work for and check out their websites. Many companies have pages on their websites devoted to career opportunities, which you’ll want to bookmark and check often. For a life hack on how to search multiple companies’ career pages using a Google trick, check out Option Three in the How to Find Unadvertised Jobs blog from Glassdoor.com.

Social Media. Savvy businesses maximize their Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn status updates, and other social media accounts to publicize for free their current job openings. Some mid-size and larger companies even have unique social media accounts devoted to careers and recruiting, separate from their customer or end-user accounts.

College Career Centers. While you are still a student, be sure to take full advantage of your college’s career center. In addition to maintaining lists of job openings and internships from local employers that may not be posted elsewhere, the staff at these university job offices can help you with your résumé, coach you for your interviews, or even cultivate letters of recommendation for you.

Government Job Resource Center.  To find local resources, you may have to think like a thesaurus when you do your online search. Government resources can go by many names, from workforce resource center, career services, employment center, job network… the list goes on. Services can be provided under the auspices of local governments to state economic development departments.  If you’re not a master-Googler, start at the national American Job Center for links to some resources.

Check out Part 2 of this article next week, for five more alternatives to job boards.

Readers: What sources, besides the online job boards, have proved most fruitful in your job search?

Do you have a question for Anita Clew? Visit http://anitaclew.com/ask-anita/.

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Is Telecommuting Right for You and Your Company? Part 2


Dear, Anita,

I manage a department of 12. One of my employees is pregnant and wants to work from home – permanently – after the baby arrives. I’m concerned that this first-time mother is not being realistic about getting work done with an infant around. She’s a great worker and I don’t want to lose her. How can I decide whether to allow her to telecommute? If we do permit her to work from home, I feel like we will need new company policies, as other employees may want to work virtually as well. Any advice?

Dear, Doubting Thomas,

Last year, Yahoo! announced that all remote employees would need to come back to work in corporate offices. While telecommuting wasn’t working for Yahoo!, your company may be a different story.  In last week’s blog, we looked at telecommuting from an employee’s point of view (see Part 1).  Now, let’s contemplate the pros and cons from a manager’s mindset.

PROS

Increased Productivity. While not a given, many virtual employees and their supervisors notice an increase in productivity because they don’t have the typical office interruptions. Plus, there’s no time suck around the water cooler!

Flexible Schedules. While this sounds like a pro for the employee, it can also be a benefit to the employer. You may have a night owl, who can take a 5 p.m. e-mail from you and have a report back in your in-box by 8 a.m.

Working from home with a babyHappier Employees. Work-life balance is a key factor in job satisfaction. And who wouldn’t be in a better mood when the commute is down the hall and not down the bumper-to-bumper freeway?

Employee Retention. See above.

Top Talent. In the future, your company may be able to recruit by skill rather than by geographic location.

Reduced Overhead. While your company may not realize cost savings until it has many more virtual workers, some businesses note a decrease in real estate, infrastructure, HVAC, and electricity costs.

Decreased Carbon Footprint. If your business is interested in its environmental impact, the US Consumer Electronics Association (CEA) confirmed that the fuel savings more than compensate for the extra emissions from home-based offices.

No Snow Days. Virtual employees can still work during a polar vortex (assuming, of course, they don’t lose power)!

CONS

Equipment Costs. Computer, phone, high-speed Internet connection, printer – to set up a home office without stripping your company’s desks bare can be costly.

Long-Distance Tech Support. What happens when the power goes out or the Internet goes down at an employee’s home office? It may be harder for your IT department to deal with remote technical problems.

Supervision. It’s easy to be “out-of-sight, out-of-mind” when you aren’t walking by employees’ desks daily. Use random calls and e-mails to make sure the off-site employees are hard at work, until they’ve built up trust.

Communication. With so many videoconferencing and high-tech ways to stay in touch, I hesitate to include this on the “con” list. After all, how much time do you really spend interacting face-to-face (and not leaving an e-mail trail) with co-workers? Facetime or Skype meetings are beneficial. Perhaps regularly scheduled in-office days are necessary, or a combination of both teleconferencing and on-site presence.

Slacking. Make sure the deadlines for deliverables don’t slip. Of course, everyone is human and misses a target date on occasion. Just make sure it doesn’t become a habit. Self-motivated, disciplined individuals are the best candidates for virtual workers.

Creating/Maintaining Teams.  With this employee, you’ve had the advantage of previous face-to-face interaction, feedback, and mentoring. But creating teamwork and maintaining the corporate culture with new hires may be tricky.

If the pros outweigh the cons, give your new mom a telecommuting trial of 30, 60, or 90 days beyond her maternity leave. At that time, evaluate if the arrangement is working or whether you really do need her position to work within the office environment. Also, continue the check-ins at periodic intervals. Working at home with a three-month-old is far different than with a crawling six-month-old. What works at first may not work in the long-term.

Supervisors, do you have any tips to share for managing virtual workers?

Need some job advice? Anita Clew is happy to help. Click here to Ask Anita.

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Is Telecommuting Right for You and Your Company? Part 1


Dear, Anita,

I’m a single mom with two small children – one is in 2nd grade and has to go to an after-school program and the other I currently have in pre-school.  By the time I get home, there’s barely time for dinner, homework (for the oldest) and a bath before bed. I would love to work from home so that I can save on child-care expenses, and be there more for my kids during these younger years. How can I ask my boss if working remotely is an option?

Dear, There’s No Place Like Home,

WorldatWork estimates that 16 million employees work at home at least one day a month. Believe it or not, the federal government has the highest proportion of teleworkers at 3.3%, according to GlobalWorkplaceAnalytics.com, over 2.6% for private sector for-profit employers.

In this two-part blog, we’ll contemplate the issues both employees and managers should examine to see if telecommuting is a feasible option.  We’ll look at telecommuting from the employee’s perspective today.

MC900156995[1]Working from home could save you commute time, but you will still be motoring to school for drop-offs and pick-ups. At least the 3 p.m. pickup isn’t during prime rush hour. (And what will you do in summer? Send the kids to camp?) Telecommuting is “green,” reducing pollution and saving gas.  The latter will save you, the employee, money. Speaking of money, as you mentioned, you’ll likely save big on childcare. You may even save on your work wardrobe, too, but be careful not to get too lazy and work in your bathrobe all day. If your company is fast-growing, adding more employees, and needing to lease more office space for its burgeoning workforce, there could be cost savings for your employer you’ll want to tout if you opt to work at home.

Think about your actual work. Do you need to be on call during regular office hours?  Do you need to use special equipment not easily replicated at home (high-end color copiers, as an example)? While e-mail is a boon for telecommuters, is telephone contact often required for your position (and will your pre-schooler understand Mommy can’t talk during important business phone calls)? Is frequent face-to-face interaction with clients or even co-workers necessary? If you answered yes to any of these questions, it’s going to be harder to convince your boss telecommuting is a good idea.

Evaluate your personality. Some telecommuters report feelings of isolation. After a few months of working at home with your kids, you may long for grown-up conversation. Are you self-motivated? There’s the refrigerator, enticing you for a snack break you wouldn’t have even thought of while working at your office. Or the washing machine whispering, “C’mon, just one little load.” The best telecommuters are disciplined to get their work done without supervisors looking over their shoulders.

Is your home environment conducive to telecommuting? One reason for working from home is to have fewer distractions than at the office, with ringing phones, coworkers interrupting, etc. With two small children in the picture, your home office may be more chaotic! Honestly assess whether you think having a full-time preschooler underfoot is conducive to getting your work tasks done efficiently. Will your company’s IT department be able to supply you with a laptop or desktop computer for your home? (Oops, there go those cost savings for your employer!) Is your Internet connection at home reliable and up to speed? Will you have a dedicated workspace or will your laptop reside on the dining room table, where your weekly report runs the risk of marinara stains?  For your sanity’s sake, it is helpful if your virtual office has a door, so you can close up shop and not be tempted to work 24/7.

Telecommuting must be a win-win situation, so be sure to prepare your rationale before discussing the idea with your supervisor. Suggest a trial, starting with working from home one day a week to see if the arrangement functions well for both parties.  As unfair as it sounds, you’ll need to prove your value working off-site more so than when you worked in the office.

Next week, we’ll look at telecommuting from a manager’s perspective.

Calling all telecommuters! Share your best advice on how to make working at home, well… work.

Need some job advice? Anita Clew is happy to help. Click here to Ask Anita.

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Disclaimer

Anita Clew's blog posts are intended for general guidance and should never be taken as legal advice. In all instances where harassment, inequity, or unfair treatment is believed to be present, please consult your HR Department or legal representation.
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